I can put git-annex fsck in a loop to check a large directory like this:

-S starts an incremental check, -m continues the started incremental check, &>> appends all output (both stdout and stderr) into the fsck.log file.

``` $ git-annex fsck -S large-directory --from remote-repo --time-limit=60s &>>~/log/fsck.log

...

...

...

$ while (sleep 10); do git-annex fsck -m large-directory --from remote-repo --time-limit=1h &>>~/log/fsck.log

...

...

...

done; ```

I need the loop because the connection to remote-repo fails after some time (or because remote server error) and needs a reconnect, after that, everything is ok.

Suppose, I have many large directories and it would be faster to check them if I could run them parallelly. Many small files, they do not take too much bandwidth but more I/O and network communication.

I know that the progress of fsck is stored in a database (now after every 1000 files or 5 minutes or --time-limit) but is the checked directory (large-directory) is taken into account when starting/storing the progress?

Is the checked directory/path in the primary-key? Or is it much more complicated?

If I could start checking many directories in the same time, fsck would finish much faster (think about thousands of small icon files). Is it just me or somebody else could profit from this?

(This is not a feature request, I would like to know if anybody needs this, if possible at all.)

Thanks, parhuzamos